Youth > 
Video Library > 
Physical > 
Balance

Balance

Line Jumps

Line Jumps is great drill for athletes between the ages of 6 - 12.  Have your athletes stand about 2-4 feet back from a line.  On your cue, they will jump and try to land with their toes as close to the line as possible without actually touching it. 



Single Leg Balance w/Basketball

As well as improving dexterity and hand speed this drill will improve balance and core strength.  The athletes will stand on one leg and move the basketball quickly around their waist.  It is important they continually challenge themselves to move the ball as quickly as possible.



Get Ups to Balance

Balance is critical in all sports and needs to be a part of warm-up in many of our youth basketball practices. "Get Ups to Balance" is a great, but simple, balance activity that kids enjoy.



Triangle Footwork

Youth coaches must always spend time each practice working on their player's ABC'S (agility, balance, coordination, speed). This is a simple drill to work on the speed component using defensive sliding, sprinting and backpedaling. The drill can be competitive by matching players up against each other or just work on the footwork.  

The first players in each line will place their inside foot on the lane line.  On the command "go!" each player slides towards the corner. 



King of the Mountain/Queen of the Hill

Laura Ramus, the head trainer for the Detroit Shock of the WNBA wrote "Balance is the single most important component of athletic ability because it underlies all movement. Balance is a component of all movement whether that movement is dominated by strength, speed, flexibility or endurance"



Single Leg Balance and Reach

Laura Ramus, the head trainer for the Detroit Shock of the WNBA wrote "Balance is the single most important component of athletic ability because it underlies all movement. Balance is a component of all movement whether that movement is dominated by strength, speed, flexibility or endurance. Balance must always precede force generation. As the old saying goes, "you can't fire a cannon from a canoe!" Therefore, problems that appear to be related to a lack of strength, speed, flexibility or skill may be in fact balance related."